Stress-Activated NRF2-MDM2 Cascade Controls Neoplastic Progression in Pancreas

1. Stress-Activated NRF2-MDM2 Cascade Controls Neoplastic Progression in Pancreas.
Despite expression of oncogenic KRAS, premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia 1 (PanIN1) lesions rarely become fully malignant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The molecular mechanisms through which established risk factors, such as chronic pancreatitis, acinar cell damage, and/or defective autophagy increase the likelihood of PDAC development are poorly understood. Jelena Todoric at Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California San Diego in La Jolla, USA and his colleagues show that accumulation of the autophagy substrate p62/SQSTM1 in stressed KrasG12D acinar cells is associated with PDAC development and maintenance of malignancy in human cells and mice. p62 accumulation promotes neoplastic progression by controlling the NRF2-mediated induction of MDM2, which acts through p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms to abrogate checkpoints that prevent conversion of differentiated acinar cells to proliferative ductal progenitors. MDM2 targeting may be useful for preventing PDAC development in high-risk individuals.

Read more, please click http://www.cell.com/cancer-cell/fulltext/S1535-6108(17)30464-6

2. A p53 Super-tumor Suppressor Reveals a Tumor Suppressive p53-Ptpn14-Yap Axis in Pancreatic Cancer.
The p53 transcription factor is a critical barrier to pancreatic cancer progression. To unravel mechanisms of p53-mediated tumor suppression, which have remained elusive, Stephano S. Mello at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, USA and his colleagues analyzed pancreatic cancer development in mice expressing p53 transcriptional activation domain (TAD) mutants. Surprisingly, the p5353,54 TAD2 mutant behaves as a “super-tumor suppressor,” with an enhanced capacity to both suppress pancreatic cancer and transactivate select p53 target genes, including Ptpn14. Ptpn14 encodes a negative regulator of the Yap oncoprotein and is necessary and sufficient for pancreatic cancer suppression, like p53. They show that p53 deficiency promotes Yap signaling and that PTPN14 and TP53 mutations are mutually exclusive in human cancers. These studies uncover a p53-Ptpn14-Yap pathway that is integral to p53-mediated tumor suppression.

Read more, please click http://www.cell.com/cancer-cell/fulltext/S1535-6108(17)30411-7

3. Epigenetic siRNA and Chemical Screens Identify SETD8 Inhibition as a Therapeutic Strategy for p53 Activation in High-Risk Neuroblastoma.
Given the paucity of druggable mutations in high-risk neuroblastoma (NB), Veronica Veschi at Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD, USA and his colleagues undertook chromatin-focused small interfering RNA and chemical screens to uncover epigenetic regulators critical for the differentiation block in high-risk NB. High-content Opera imaging identified 53 genes whose loss of expression led to a decrease in NB cell proliferation and 16 also induced differentiation. From these, the secondary chemical screen identified SETD8, the H4K20me1 methyltransferase, as a druggable NB target. Functional studies revealed that SETD8 ablation rescued the pro-apoptotic and cell-cycle arrest functions of p53 by decreasing p53K382me1, leading to activation of the p53 canonical pathway. In pre-clinical xenograft NB models, genetic or pharmacological (UNC0379) SETD8 inhibition conferred a significant survival advantage, providing evidence for SETD8 as a therapeutic target in NB.

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4. Dye-Independent Methods Reveal Elevated Mitochondrial Mass in Hematopoietic Stem Cells.
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) produce most cellular energy through glycolysis rather than through mitochondrial respiration. Consistent with this notion, mitochondrial mass has been reported to be low in HSCs. However, Mariana Justino de Almeida at Columbia University Medical Center in New York, USA and his colleagues found that staining with MitoTracker Green, a commonly used dye to measure mitochondrial content, leads to artefactually low fluorescence specifically in HSCs because of dye efflux. Using mtDNA quantification, enumeration of mitochondrial nucleoids, and fluorescence intensity of a genetically encoded mitochondrial reporter, they unequivocally show here that HSCs and multipotential progenitors (MPPs) have higher mitochondrial mass than lineage-committed progenitors and mature cells. Despite similar mitochondrial mass, respiratory capacity of MPPs exceeds that of HSCs. Furthermore, although elevated mitophagy has been invoked to explain low mitochondrial mass in HSCs, they observed that mitochondrial turnover capacity is comparatively low in HSCs. They propose that the role of mitochondria in HSC biology may have to be revisited in light of these findings.

Read more, please click http://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/fulltext/S1934-5909(17)30454-X

5. Injury Induces Endogenous Reprogramming and Dedifferentiation of Neuronal Progenitors to Multipotency.
Adult neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium is often depicted as a unidirectional pathway during homeostasis and repair. Brian Lin at School of Medicine, Tufts University in Boston, USA and his colleagues challenge the unidirectionality of this model by showing that epithelial injury unlocks the potential for Ascl1+ progenitors and Neurog1+ specified neuronal precursors to dedifferentiate into multipotent stem/progenitor cells that contribute significantly to tissue regeneration in the murine olfactory epithelium (OE). They characterize these dedifferentiating cells using several lineage-tracing strains and single-cell mRNA-seq, and they show that Sox2 is required for initiating dedifferentiation and that inhibition of Ezh2 promotes multipotent progenitor expansion. These results suggest that the apparent hierarchy of neuronal differentiation is not irreversible and that lineage commitment can be overridden following severe tissue injury. They elucidate a previously unappreciated pathway for endogenous tissue repair by a highly regenerative neuroepithelium and introduce a system to study the mechanisms underlying plasticity in the OE that can be adapted for other tissues.

Read more, please click http://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/fulltext/S1934-5909(17)30375-2

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